Optimize Your React App with useCallback and useMemo: React Hooks Series Part 4

Published: 31.01.2024

In this fourth installment, we'll delve into the powerful world of useCallback and useMemo. These hooks are essential for memoizing values and callbacks, offering significant performance improvements, especially when dealing with heavy operations or preventing unnecessary re-renders of components.

When I started the first article, I had no idea it would turn into a series. Now, here we are at Part 4, exploring the intricacies of useCallback and useMemo. Before we dive in, you can catch up on the previous parts of the series:

Both useCallback and useMemo leverage memoization, an optimization technique to speed up programs by caching function call results. Memoization stores and caches the results of function calls, returning them instantly when the same input is encountered again, thus avoiding redundant computations.

useCallback

According to the official React documentation, useCallback returns a memoized callback. It provides a memoized version of the callback that only changes if any of its dependencies change. While it might be tempting to use useCallback for every function, like any optimization, it comes with potential drawbacks. In some cases, it might even slow down your application instead of making it faster.

const memoizedCallback = useCallback(
  () => {
    doSomething(a, b);
  },
  [a, b],
);

Careful consideration is crucial when deciding where to use useCallback. For instance, if your App.js manages three different counters, and you don't want functions to rerender when the state of one counter updates, useCallback can be beneficial. However, it's essential to note that the overhead of creating such functions is often negligible, and applying useCallback indiscriminately can potentially hinder performance.

useMemo

Similar to useCallback, useMemo utilizes memoization, but it memoizes values instead of callbacks. Suppose you have a computationally expensive operation. In that case, you can use useMemo to cache the result, preventing the need to recompute it during every rerender. Just like with useCallback, caution is advised when implementing these hooks, as optimization should only be pursued when measurable benefits are anticipated.

const memoizedValue = useMemo(() => computeExpensiveValue(a, b), [a, b]);

Before You Optimize

Before diving into the world of optimization with React hooks, it's crucial to assess whether your application truly requires it. Blindly applying memoization without measurable gains can lead to a slower, more convoluted application. Always measure the impact of your optimizations to ensure they contribute positively to your app's performance.

Thank you for following the React Hooks series. Happy coding!

And what can we do for you?_

Do you want to know more or are you interested? Please feel free to contact us directly, by phone or via mail.
Or use one of our contact forms so that we can answer you as quickly and appropriately as possible can give. We would love to hear from you!

back to top